Definition of impose verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    impose

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ɪmˈpəʊz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpoʊz//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they impose
    BrE BrE//ɪmˈpəʊz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpoʊz//
     
    he / she / it imposes
    BrE BrE//ɪmˈpəʊzɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpoʊzɪz//
     
    past simple imposed
    BrE BrE//ɪmˈpəʊzd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpoʊzd//
     
    past participle imposed
    BrE BrE//ɪmˈpəʊzd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpoʊzd//
     
    -ing form imposing
    BrE BrE//ɪmˈpəʊzɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪmˈpoʊzɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  [transitive] impose something (on/upon something/somebody) to introduce a new law, rule, tax, etc.; to order that a rule, punishment, etc. be used A new tax was imposed on fuel.
  2. 2  [transitive] impose something (on/upon somebody/something) to force somebody/something to have to deal with something that is difficult or unpleasant to impose limitations/restrictions/constraints on something This system imposes additional financial burdens on many people. The time limits are imposed on us by factors outside our control.
  3. 3  [transitive] impose something (on/upon somebody) to make somebody accept the same opinions, wishes, etc. as your own She didn't want to impose her values on her family. It was noticeable how a few people managed to impose their will on the others.
  4. 4[intransitive] to expect somebody to do something for you or to spend time with you, when it may not be convenient for them ‘You must stay for lunch.’ ‘Well, thanks, but I don’t want to impose…’ impose on/upon somebody/something Everyone imposes on Dave's good nature.
  5. 5[transitive] impose yourself (on/upon somebody/something) to make somebody/something accept or be aware of your presence or ideas European civilization was the first to impose itself across the whole world.
  6. Word Origin late 15th cent. (in the sense ‘impute’): from French imposer, from Latin imponere ‘inflict, deceive’ (from in- ‘in, upon’ + ponere ‘put’), but influenced by impositus ‘inflicted’ and Old French poser ‘to place’.Extra examples New technology cannot be used successfully if it is simply imposed on an unwilling workforce. One side in the conflict cannot unilaterally impose a settlement. People did not accept these national borders which had been arbitrarily imposed. The government has imposed a ban on the sale of handguns. The terms of the contract were effectively imposed rather than agreed. The will of the majority has been forcibly imposed on the minority. a centrally imposed school curriculum the pressure of having to meet externally imposed targets A prison sentence of 25 years was imposed on each of the defendants. I don’t want to impose on you people. I feel imposed upon when I have to take work home. No, I won’t come in—I don’t want to impose. The system imposes additional financial burdens on many people. They have imposed restrictions on water use.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: impose