English

Definition of induce verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    induce

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈdjuːs//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈduːs//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they induce
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈdjuːs//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈduːs//
     
    he / she / it induces
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈdjuːsɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈduːsɪz//
     
    past simple induced
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈdjuːst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈduːst//
     
    past participle induced
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈdjuːst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈduːst//
     
    -ing form inducing
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈdjuːsɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈduːsɪŋ//
     
    Birth
     
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  1. 1induce somebody to do something (formal) to persuade or influence somebody to do something Nothing would induce me to take the job.
  2. 2induce something (formal) to cause something drugs which induce sleep a drug-induced coma
  3. 3 induce somebody/something (medical) to make a woman start giving birth to her baby by giving her special drugs Wordfinderbirth, breech birth, caesarean, contraction, deliver, induce, labour, midwife, obstetrics, umbilical cord an induced labour We'll have to induce her. See related entries: Birth
  4. Word Origin late Middle English (formerly also as enduce): from Latin inducere ‘lead in’, from in- ‘into’ + ducere ‘to lead’, or from French enduire.Extra examples Doctors will begin bringing him out of a drug-induced coma on Sunday. Hearing loss is often induced by exposure to loud noise. Large commissions were required to induce banks to participate in deals. No amount of persuasion could induce her to stay longer.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: induce