English

Definition of institute verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

  

institute

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ˈɪnstɪtjuːt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈɪnstɪtuːt//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they institute
BrE BrE//ˈɪnstɪtjuːt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈɪnstɪtuːt//
 
he / she / it institutes
BrE BrE//ˈɪnstɪtjuːts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈɪnstɪtuːts//
 
past simple instituted
BrE BrE//ˈɪnstɪtjuːtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈɪnstɪtuːtɪd//
 
past participle instituted
BrE BrE//ˈɪnstɪtjuːtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈɪnstɪtuːtɪd//
 
-ing form instituting
BrE BrE//ˈɪnstɪtjuːtɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈɪnstɪtuːtɪŋ//
 
 
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institute something (formal) to introduce a system, policy, etc. or start a process to institute criminal proceedings against somebody The new management intends to institute a number of changes. Word Origin Middle English (originally meaning to appoint someone to a position): from Latin institut- ‘established’, from the verb instituere, from in- ‘in, towards’ + statuere ‘set up’. The noun is from Latin institutum ‘something designed, precept’, neuter past participle of instituere; the current sense dates from the early 19th cent.Extra examples She formally instituted divorce proceedings against her husband. The Church was seen as divinely instituted. They could institute criminal proceedings against you.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: institute