English

Definition of intelligent adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    intelligent

     adjective
    adjective
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈtelɪdʒənt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈtelɪdʒənt//
     
    Clever
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1  good at learning, understanding and thinking in a logical way about things; showing this ability a highly intelligent child to ask an intelligent question Synonymsintelligentsmart clever brilliant brightThese words all describe people who are good at learning, understanding and thinking about things, and the actions that show this ability.intelligent good at learning, understanding and thinking in a logical way about things; showing this ability:He’s a highly intelligent man. She asked a lot of intelligent questions.smart (especially North American English) quick at learning and understanding things; showing the ability to make good business or personal decisions:She’s smarter than her brother. That was a smart career move.clever (sometimes disapproving, especially British English) quick at learning and understanding things; showing this ability:How clever of you to work it out! He’s too clever by half, if you ask me. People use clever in the phrase :Clever boy/​girl! to tell a young child that they have learnt or done something well. When used to or about an adult clever can be disapproving.brilliant extremely intelligent or skilful:He’s a brilliant young scientist.bright intelligent; quick to learn:She’s probably the brightest student in the class. Bright is used especially to talk about young people. Common collocations of bright include girl, boy, kid, student, pupil.Patterns clever/​brilliant at something a(n) intelligent/​smart/​clever/​brilliant/​bright child/​boy/​girl/​man/​woman a(n) intelligent/​smart/​clever/​brilliant thing to do opposite unintelligent See related entries: Clever
  2. 2  (of an animal, a being, etc.) able to understand and learn things a search for intelligent life on other planets
  3. 3 (computing) (of a computer, program, etc.) able to store information and use it in new situations intelligent software/systems
  4. Word Origin early 16th cent.: from Latin intelligent- ‘understanding’, from the verb intelligere, variant of intellegere ‘understand’, from inter ‘between’ + legere ‘choose’.Extra examples He should be able to solve the problem. He’s reasonably intelligent. Why do otherwise intelligent people take this event so seriously? a highly intelligent woman He’s a highly intelligent man. She asked a lot of intelligent questions.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: intelligent

Other results

All matches