Definition of interview verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    interview

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈɪntəvjuː//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɪntərvjuː//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they interview
    BrE BrE//ˈɪntəvjuː//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɪntərvjuː//
     
    he / she / it interviews
    BrE BrE//ˈɪntəvjuːz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɪntərvjuːz//
     
    past simple interviewed
    BrE BrE//ˈɪntəvjuːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɪntərvjuːd//
     
    past participle interviewed
    BrE BrE//ˈɪntəvjuːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɪntərvjuːd//
     
    -ing form interviewing
    BrE BrE//ˈɪntəvjuːɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈɪntərvjuːɪŋ//
     
    Job interviews, Radio broadcasting, Producing TV shows, TV shows
     
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  1. 1  [transitive, intransitive] interview (somebody) (for a job, etc.) to talk to somebody and ask them questions at a formal meeting to find out if they are suitable for a job, course of study, etc. Which post are you being interviewed for? We interviewed ten people for the job. The deadline for applications is 15 October and we will be interviewing early in November. See related entries: Job interviews
  2. 2[intransitive] (especially North American English) interview (for a job, etc.) to talk to somebody and answer questions at a formal meeting to get a job, a place on a course of study, etc. The website gives you tips on interviewing for colleges. (British English, North American English) If you don't interview well you are unlikely to get the job.
  3. 3  [transitive] to ask somebody questions about their life, opinions, etc., especially on the radio or television or for a newspaper or magazine interview somebody about something Next week, I will be interviewing Spielberg about his latest movie. interview somebody The Prime Minister declined to be interviewed. I heard him being interviewed on the news earlier. See related entries: Radio broadcasting, Producing TV shows, TV shows
  4. 4  [transitive] interview somebody (about something) to ask somebody questions at a private meeting The police are waiting to interview the injured man.
  5. Word Origin early 16th cent. (formerly also as enterview): from French entrevue, from s'entrevoir ‘see each other’, from voir ‘to see’, on the pattern of vue ‘a view’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: interview

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