Definition of invite verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    invite

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvaɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvaɪt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they invite
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvaɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvaɪt//
     
    he / she / it invites
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvaɪts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvaɪts//
     
    past simple invited
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvaɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvaɪtɪd//
     
    past participle invited
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvaɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvaɪtɪd//
     
    -ing form inviting
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvaɪtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvaɪtɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  to ask somebody to come to a social event invite somebody to something Have you been invited to their party? invite somebody I'd have liked to have gone but I wasn't invited. invite somebody to do something They have invited me to go to Paris with them. Express YourselfInviting somebody to somethingHere are some ways of making and responding to invitations: Would you like to come for a meal on Saturday? There's a presentation of our new product at the conference on Tuesday. Would you be interested in coming along? I'm going to the game on Saturday—how about joining me? We're going to Boston—do you want to come with us?(informal or North American English)Responses: That would be very nice, thank you. I'd love to, thanks very much. I'm sorry. I've already got something on at the weekend. I'm sorry. I already have plans on Saturday. (British English) Thank you, I'll check my diary and let you know. (North American English) Thank you, I'll check my calendar and let you know.
  2. 2  (formal) to ask somebody formally to go somewhere or do something invite somebody (to/for something) Successful candidates will be invited for interview next week. invite something (from somebody) He invited questions from the audience. invite somebody to do something Readers are invited to email their comments to us.
  3. 3invite something | invite somebody/something to do something to make something, especially something bad or unpleasant, likely to happen synonym ask for Such comments are just inviting trouble.
  4. see also uninvited
    Word Origin mid 16th cent.: from Old French inviter, or from Latin invitare.Extra examples I was never invited into the house. Let’s invite them all for dinner. She very kindly invited me to lunch. Thank you for inviting me to the meeting. The film seems to invite comparison with ‘The Italian Job’. The hype and fervour surrounding the event positively invited scepticism. They’ve invited us over for a drink. You are cordially invited to attend the annual parish meeting. I’d have liked to have gone but I wasn’t invited. If he has any complaints to make, I invite him to do so. Readers are invited to write in with their comments. Phrasal Verbsinvite somebody alonginvite somebody backinvite somebody ininvite somebody over
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: invite