Definition of invoke verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    invoke

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvəʊk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvoʊk//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they invoke
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvəʊk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvoʊk//
     
    he / she / it invokes
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvəʊks//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvoʊks//
     
    past simple invoked
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvəʊkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvoʊkt//
     
    past participle invoked
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvəʊkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvoʊkt//
     
    -ing form invoking
    BrE BrE//ɪnˈvəʊkɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ɪnˈvoʊkɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1invoke something (against somebody) to mention or use a law, rule, etc. as a reason for doing something It is unlikely that libel laws will be invoked.
  2. 2invoke somebody/something to mention a person, a theory, an example, etc. to support your opinions or ideas, or as a reason for something She invoked several eminent scholars to back up her argument.
  3. 3invoke something to mention somebody’s name to make people feel a particular thing or act in a particular way His name was invoked as a symbol of the revolution.
  4. 4invoke somebody to make a request (for help) to somebody, especially a god
  5. 5invoke something to make somebody have a particular feeling or imagine a particular scene synonym evoke The opening paragraph invokes a vision of England in the early Middle Ages. Some people think this use is not correct.
  6. 6invoke something (computing) to begin to run a program, etc. This command will invoke the HELP system.
  7. 7invoke somebody/something to make evil appear by using magic
  8. Word Origin late 15th cent.: from French invoquer, from Latin invocare, from in- ‘upon’ + vocare ‘to call’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: invoke