Definition of irate adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

irate

 adjective
adjective
BrE BrE//aɪˈreɪt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//aɪˈreɪt//
 
Anger
 
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very angry irate customers an irate phone call Synonymsangrymad indignant cross irateThese words all describe people feeling and/​or showing anger.angry feeling or showing anger:Please don’t be angry with me. Thousands of angry demonstrators filled the square.mad [not before noun] (informal, especially North American English) angry:He got mad and walked out. She’s mad at me for being late. Mad is the usual word for ‘angry’ in informal American English. In British English, the phrase ‘go mad’ means ‘very angry’:Dad’ll go mad when he sees what you’ve done. ‘Go mad’ can also mean ‘go crazy’ or ‘get very excited’.indignant feeling or showing anger and surprise because you think that you or somebody else has been treated unfairly:She was very indignant at the way she had been treated.cross (especially British English, rather informal) rather angry or annoyed:I was quite cross with him for being late. This word is often used by or to children.irate very angry:irate customers an irate letter Irate is not usually followed by a preposition:She was irate with me/​about it.Patterns angry/​mad/​indignant/​cross about/​at something angry/​cross with somebody (for doing something) angry/​mad/​indignant/​cross that to get angry/​mad/​cross to make somebody angry/​mad/​cross See related entries: Anger Word Origin mid 19th cent.: from Latin iratus, from ira ‘anger’.Extra examples She sounded extremely irate. an irate letter/​phone call irate customers/​callers
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: irate