English

Definition of ironic adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    ironic

     adjective
    adjective
    BrE BrE//ˈrɒnɪk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrɑːnɪk//
     
    (less frequent ironical
    BrE BrE//ˈrɒnɪkl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrɑːnɪkl//
     
    )
     
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  1. 1showing that you really mean the opposite of what you are saying; expressingironyan ironic comment
  2. 2(of a situation) strange or amusing because it is very different from what you expect It's ironic that she became a teacher—she used to hate school. see also irony
  3. Word Origin mid 17th cent.: from French ironique or late Latin ironicus, from Greek eirōnikos ‘dissembling, feigning ignorance’, from eirōneia ‘simulated ignorance’, from eirōn ‘dissembler’.Extra examples He was greeted with ironic cheers from opposition MPs. It’s ironic that she became a teacher—she used to hate school. She sent him a faintly ironic sideways glance.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: ironic