English

Definition of judge verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    judge

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//dʒʌdʒ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dʒʌdʒ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they judge
    BrE BrE//dʒʌdʒ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dʒʌdʒ//
     
    he / she / it judges
    BrE BrE//ˈdʒʌdʒɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdʒʌdʒɪz//
     
    past simple judged
    BrE BrE//dʒʌdʒd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dʒʌdʒd//
     
    past participle judged
    BrE BrE//dʒʌdʒd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//dʒʌdʒd//
     
    -ing form judging
    BrE BrE//ˈdʒʌdʒɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈdʒʌdʒɪŋ//
     
     
    jump to other results
    form opinion
  1. 1  [intransitive, transitive] to form an opinion about somebody/something, based on the information you have As far as I can judge, all of them are to blame. Judging by her last letter, they are having a wonderful time. To judge from what he said, he was very disappointed. judge somebody/something (on something) Schools should not be judged only on exam results. Each painting must be judged on its own merits. judge somebody/something + noun The tour was judged a great success. judge somebody/something to be/do something The concert was judged to have been a great success. judge somebody/something + adj. They judged it wise to say nothing. judge that… He judged that the risk was too great. it is judged that… It was judged that the risk was too great. judge how, what, etc… It was hard to judge how great the risk was.
  2. estimate
  3. 2  [transitive] to guess the size, amount, etc. of something judge how, what, etc… It's difficult to judge how long the journey will take. judge somebody/something to be/do something I judged him to be about 50.
  4. in competition
  5. 3  [transitive, intransitive] judge (something) to decide the result of a competition; to be the judge in a competition She was asked to judge the essay competition.
  6. give opinion
  7. 4  [transitive, intransitive] judge (somebody) to give your opinion about somebody, especially when you disapprove of them What gives you the right to judge other people?
  8. in court
  9. 5[transitive] to decide whether somebody is guilty or innocent in a court judge something to judge a case judge somebody + adj. to judge somebody guilty/not guilty
  10. Word Origin Middle English: from Old French juge (noun), juger (verb), from Latin judex, judic-, from jus ‘law’ + dicere ‘to say’.Extra examples ‘There’s something I haven’t told you.’ She judged her words carefully. He believed that schools should be judged according to strictly academic criteria. He seems to have been a popular person, judging by the number of people at his funeral. He was often judged solely on his looks. I am in no position to judge whether what she is doing is right or wrong. I think I judged the distance wrongly. I think you’re judging her rather harshly. It’s not for me to judge whether he made the right decision. People use different criteria for judging success at school. Readers are left to judge for themselves whether McCrombie is hero or villain. The age of the furniture can be judged from the type of wood used. The bowler judged it well, timing the ball to perfection. Their performance of the concerto was beautifully judged and finely controlled. Those who preach intolerance should be judged accordingly. To judge from what she said, she was very disappointed. You always judge your own performance against that of others. You soon learn to judge distances when driving. You will be judged by the work you have produced over the year. Your slogan will be judged on its originality and style. judging his own performance against the performance of others learning to judge distances As far as I can judge, they are all to blame. Don’t judge a book by its cover. He sensed that she was judging him. I don’t really think that you’re in a position to judge. I judged that he must be a very lonely man. It’s difficult to judge exactly how accurate the account is. It’s difficult to judge how long the journey will take. Judging by her last letter, they are having a great time. Judging from what he said, he was very disappointed. Should he be judged guilty of murder? The first team to cross the line will be judged the winner. There will be judging in three age groups. They could dismiss workers participating in strikes judged to be illegal. You quickly learn to judge the distances involved. You shouldn’t judge by appearances. You shouldn’t judge her too harshly. Young children are unable to judge the speed of traffic.Idioms
    don’t judge a book by its cover
     
    jump to other results
    (saying) used to say that you should not form an opinion about somebody/something from their appearance only
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: judge