English

Definition of kid verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    kid

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//kɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kɪd//
     
    (informal)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they kid
    BrE BrE//kɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kɪd//
     
    he / she / it kids
    BrE BrE//kɪdz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//kɪdz//
     
    past simple kidded
    BrE BrE//ˈkɪdɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɪdɪd//
     
    past participle kidded
    BrE BrE//ˈkɪdɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɪdɪd//
     
    -ing form kidding
    BrE BrE//ˈkɪdɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkɪdɪŋ//
     
    Dishonest
     
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  1. 1[intransitive, transitive] (usually used in the progressive tenses) to tell somebody something that is not true, especially as a joke synonym joke I thought he was kidding when he said he was going out with a rock star. I didn't mean it. I was only kidding. kid somebody I'm not kidding you. It does work. See related entries: Dishonest
  2. 2[transitive] to allow somebody/yourself to believe something that is not true synonym deceive kid somebody/yourself They're kidding themselves if they think it's going to be easy. kid somebody/yourself (that)… I tried to kid myself (that) everything was normal. More Like This Consonant-doubling verbs bob, club, dub, grab, rub, sob, throb kid, nod, pad, plod, prod, shred, skid, thud beg, blog, bug, drag, drug, flag, hug, jog, log, mug, nag, plug bar, confer, infer, occur, prefer, refer, star, stir, transfer acquit, admit, allot, chat, clot, commit, jut, knit, pat, regret, rot, spot, submit (in British English:) appal, cancel, channel, control, counsel, enrol, equal, excel, fuel, fulfil, label, level, marvel, model, pedal, quarrel, signal, travelSee worksheet.
  3. Word Originverb early 19th cent.: perhaps from kid (noun), expressing the notion “make a child or goat of”.Extra examples Don’t look so worried—I was just kidding. He was only kidding about the car having disappeared. Oh come on, who are you trying to kid?. I didn’t mean it. I was only kidding. I’m not kidding you. It does work. Of course you don’t have to work at weekends—I was only joking/​kidding! She fired you? You’re kidding! Why? They’re kidding themselves if they think it’s going to be easy. Were you joking/​kidding when you told him to leave?Idioms
    1. 1used to emphasize that something is true or that you agree with something that somebody has just said ‘It's cold!’ ‘No kidding!’
    2. 2used to show that you mean what you are saying I want the money back tomorrow. No kidding.
    you’re kidding, you must be kidding
     
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    (informal) used to show that you are very surprised at something that somebody has just said
    Phrasal Verbskid around
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: kid