Definition of log verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    log

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//lɒɡ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//lɔːɡ//
     
    , NAmE//lɑːɡ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they log
    BrE BrE//lɒɡ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//lɔːɡ//
     
    , NAmE//lɑːɡ//
     
    he / she / it logs
    BrE BrE//lɒɡz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//lɔːɡz//
     
    , NAmE//lɑːɡz//
     
    past simple logged
    BrE BrE//lɒɡd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//lɔːɡd//
     
    , NAmE//lɑːɡd//
     
    past participle logged
    BrE BrE//lɒɡd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//lɔːɡd//
     
    , NAmE//lɑːɡd//
     
    -ing form logging
    BrE BrE//ˈlɒɡɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈlɔːɡɪŋ//
     
    , NAmE//ˈlɑːɡɪŋ//
     
    Conservation
     
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  1. 1log something to put information in an official record or write a record of events synonym record The police log all phone calls.
  2. 2log something to travel a particular distance or for a particular length of time synonym clock up The pilot has logged 1 000 hours in the air.
  3. 3log something to cut down trees in a forest for their wood More Like This Consonant-doubling verbs bob, club, dub, grab, rub, sob, throb kid, nod, pad, plod, prod, shred, skid, thud beg, blog, bug, drag, drug, flag, hug, jog, log, mug, nag, plug bar, confer, infer, occur, prefer, refer, star, stir, transfer acquit, admit, allot, chat, clot, commit, jut, knit, pat, regret, rot, spot, submit (in British English:) appal, cancel, channel, control, counsel, enrol, equal, excel, fuel, fulfil, label, level, marvel, model, pedal, quarrel, signal, travelSee worksheet. See related entries: Conservation
  4. Word Originverb Middle English (in the sense ‘bulky mass of wood’): of unknown origin; perhaps symbolic of the notion of heaviness.Extra examples All phone calls were recorded on tape and logged. It was a diary logging life on a sailing ship in the 1870s. The call was logged at 16.20. The crimes were logged but not investigated. Phrasal Verbslog inlog in somebodylog offlog off somebody
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: log