English

Definition of lure verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

lure

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//lʊə(r)//
 
, BrE//ljʊə(r)//
 
; NAmE NAmE//lʊr//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they lure
BrE BrE//lʊə(r)//
 
, BrE//ljʊə(r)//
 
; NAmE NAmE//lʊr//
 
he / she / it lures
BrE BrE//lʊəz//
 
, BrE//ljʊəz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//lʊrz//
 
past simple lured
BrE BrE//lʊəd//
 
, BrE//ljʊəd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//lʊrd//
 
past participle lured
BrE BrE//lʊəd//
 
, BrE//ljʊəd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//lʊrd//
 
-ing form luring
BrE BrE//ˈlʊərɪŋ//
 
, BrE//ˈljʊərɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈlʊrɪŋ//
 
 
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lure somebody (+ adv./prep.) (disapproving) to persuade or trick somebody to go somewhere or to do something by promising them a reward synonym entice The child was lured into a car but managed to escape. Young people are lured to the city by the prospect of a job and money. Word Origin Middle English: from Old French luere, of Germanic origin; probably related to German Luder ‘bait’.Extra examples Comsumers are often lured into debt by unscrupulous lenders. He tried to lure her away from her friends. He used sweets to lure the child away. I tried to lure the fox back with some food. The sirens sang to lure sailors to destruction. the woman who had lured him to his death
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: lure

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