English

Definition of mail verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    mail

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//meɪl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//meɪl//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they mail
    BrE BrE//meɪl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//meɪl//
     
    he / she / it mails
    BrE BrE//meɪlz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//meɪlz//
     
    past simple mailed
    BrE BrE//meɪld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//meɪld//
     
    past participle mailed
    BrE BrE//meɪld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//meɪld//
     
    -ing form mailing
    BrE BrE//ˈmeɪlɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈmeɪlɪŋ//
     
    Email
     
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  1. 1  (especially North American English) to send something to somebody using the postal system mail something (to somebody/something) Don't forget to mail that letter to your mother. mail somebody something Don't forget to mail your mother that letter. mail somebody/something The company intends to mail 50 000 households in the area. British/​Americanpost / mailNouns In British English the official system used for sending and delivering letters, parcels/​packages, etc. is usually called the post. In North American English it is usually called the mail:I’ll put an application form in the post/​mail for you today. Send your fee by post/​mail to this address. Mail is sometimes used in British English in such expressions asthe Royal Mail. Post occurs in North American English in such expressions asthe US Postal Service. In British English post is also used to mean the letters, parcels/​packages, etc. that are delivered to you. Mail is the usual word in North American English and is sometimes also used in British English:Was there any post/​mail this morning? I sat down to open my post/​mail.Verbs Compare:I’ll post the letter when I go out. (British English) and(North American English) I’ll mail the letter when I go out.Compounds Note these words: postman (British English), mailman/mail carrier (both North American English); postbox (British English), mailbox (North American English) Some compounds are used in both British English and North American English: post office, postcard, mail order.
  2. 2  to send a message to somebody by email mail somebody Please mail us at the following email address. mail something (to somebody/something) The virus mails itself forward to everyone in your address book. mail somebody something Can you mail me that document you mentioned? See related entries: Email
  3. Word Origin Middle English (in the sense ‘travelling bag’): from Old French male ‘wallet’, of West Germanic origin. The sense “by post” dates from the mid 17th cent.Extra examples Mailing out information can be very expensive. The brochures are mailed direct to members. Don’t forget to mail that letter. Phrasal Verbsmail somethingout
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: mail