English

Definition of obey verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

  

obey

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//əˈbeɪ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//əˈbeɪ//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they obey
BrE BrE//əˈbeɪ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//əˈbeɪ//
 
he / she / it obeys
BrE BrE//əˈbeɪz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//əˈbeɪz//
 
past simple obeyed
BrE BrE//əˈbeɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//əˈbeɪd//
 
past participle obeyed
BrE BrE//əˈbeɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//əˈbeɪd//
 
-ing form obeying
BrE BrE//əˈbeɪɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//əˈbeɪɪŋ//
 
 
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[transitive, intransitive] obey (somebody/something) to do what you are told or expected to do to obey a command/an order/rules/the law He had always obeyed his parents without question. (figurative) I tried to run but my legs just wouldn't obey me. ‘Sit down!’ Meekly, she obeyed. opposite disobey Word Origin Middle English: from Old French obeir, from Latin oboedire, from ob- ‘in the direction of’ + audire ‘hear’.Extra examples He refuses to obey the rules. People have a moral duty to obey the law. Rules are rules and they must be obeyed. She was used to having her orders instantly obeyed. She’s being punished for failure to obey a court order.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: obey