Definition of prerogative noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

prerogative

 noun
noun
BrE BrE//prɪˈrɒɡətɪv//
 
; NAmE NAmE//prɪˈrɑːɡətɪv//
 
(formal)
 
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a right or advantage belonging to a particular person or group because of their importance or social position In many countries education is still the prerogative of the rich. the royal prerogative (= the special rights of a king or queen) The Prime Minister exercised his prerogative to decide when to call an election. Word Origin late Middle English: via Old French from Latin praerogativa ‘(the verdict of) the political division which was chosen to vote first in the assembly’, feminine (used as noun) of praerogativus ‘asked first’, from prae ‘before’ + rogare ‘ask’.Extra examples Making such decisions is not the sole prerogative of managers. The President has asserted the full prerogatives of his office. The tsar protected his personal prerogatives. You can of course exercise your prerogative to leave at any time. one of the prerogatives enjoyed by the president those who challenge the prerogatives of the elite women who challenge male prerogatives In many countries, education is still the prerogative of the rich. She thinks it’s a woman’s prerogative to change her mind! The king insisted that parliament uphold the royal prerogative.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: prerogative