English

Definition of presuppose verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    presuppose

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˌpriːsəˈpəʊz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌpriːsəˈpoʊz//
     
    (formal)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they presuppose
    BrE BrE//ˌpriːsəˈpəʊz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌpriːsəˈpoʊz//
     
    he / she / it presupposes
    BrE BrE//ˌpriːsəˈpəʊzɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌpriːsəˈpoʊzɪz//
     
    past simple presupposed
    BrE BrE//ˌpriːsəˈpəʊzd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌpriːsəˈpoʊzd//
     
    past participle presupposed
    BrE BrE//ˌpriːsəˈpəʊzd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌpriːsəˈpoʊzd//
     
    -ing form presupposing
    BrE BrE//ˌpriːsəˈpəʊzɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌpriːsəˈpoʊzɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1presuppose something to accept something as true or existing and act on that basis, before it has been proved to be true synonym presume Teachers sometimes presuppose a fairly high level of knowledge by the students.
  2. 2presuppose that… | presuppose something to depend on something in order to exist or be true synonym assume His argument presupposes that it does not matter who is in power. This argument presupposes that all children start off life with equal advantages.
  3. Word Origin late Middle English: from Old French presupposer, suggested by medieval Latin praesupponere, from prae ‘before’ + supponere ‘place under’ (from sub- ‘from below’ + ponere ‘to place’).
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: presuppose