Definition of promote verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    promote

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//prəˈməʊt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prəˈmoʊt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they promote
    BrE BrE//prəˈməʊt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prəˈmoʊt//
     
    he / she / it promotes
    BrE BrE//prəˈməʊts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prəˈmoʊts//
     
    past simple promoted
    BrE BrE//prəˈməʊtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prəˈmoʊtɪd//
     
    past participle promoted
    BrE BrE//prəˈməʊtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prəˈmoʊtɪd//
     
    -ing form promoting
    BrE BrE//prəˈməʊtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//prəˈmoʊtɪŋ//
     
    Marketing
     
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  1. 1  promote something to help something to happen or develop synonym encourage policies to promote economic growth a campaign to promote awareness of environmental issues
  2. 2  to help sell a product, service, etc. or make it more popular by advertising it or offering it at a special price promote something The band has gone on tour to promote their new album. promote something as something The area is being promoted as a tourist destination. CultureadvertisingMost companies in Britain and the US have to work hard to promote and market (= draw attention to and make people want) their goods in order to sell them. Political parties, charities and other organizations also use advertising. Many pages in newspapers and magazines are filled with advertisements (also called ads or, in Britain, adverts), companies advertise on the Internet and there are also advertisements, usually called commercials, on radio and television. Especially in the US, supermarkets and other stores produce leaflets, often made up of several pages, showing pictures of items that are special offers that week.Advertisements in newspapers and magazines are expensive and only the largest companies can afford to advertise their products in this way. Many organizations, however, use newspapers to advertise jobs and these are generally grouped together in the jobs section. Small companies advertise in the classified ads columns, where each advertisement consists of a few lines of text only. Shops and businesses, and individuals wanting to buy or sell used household goods, advertise in local papers.The wealthiest companies buy advertising time on television. Famous actors or singers sometimes endorse a particular product by appearing in advertisements for it. Some advertising slogans (= short phrases mentioning a product) are known by everyone, e.g. ‘Have a break – have a Kit Kat.’ Some advertisements are like very brief episodes of a story. Tobacco advertising is now banned on radio and television in Britain and the US. Advertisers have no influence over the people who make programmes, even if they help pay for the programmes through sponsorship. There is, however, an increasing amount of product placement, where firms pay for their products to be shown in films or television programmes. In the US some commercials are national, others are shown only in a particular area. Some products are sold on smaller channels by an infomercial, a commercial that lasts half an hour or more and tries to look like an entertainment programme.Other ways of advertising include displaying large posters on hoardings or billboards (= large signs) by the side of roads. Flyers (= small posters) advertising local events, for example, are given to people in the street. Restaurants advertise in theatre programmes, and shops advertise in their own magazines or on their shopping trolleys (AmE carts). Many companies advertise on the Internet.The biggest US ad agencies have offices in New York on Madison Avenue, so Madison Avenue has come to mean the advertising industry. In Britain, the advertising industry is controlled by the Advertising Standards Authority. All advertisements must be ‘legal, decent, honest and truthful’. In the US the Federal Communications Commission makes rules about advertising. Television and radio stations are required to do some public service announcements (= commercials that give information to the community) free of charge.There are many forms of advertising on the Internet. Just as firms send junk mail to people who have not asked for it, emails are used to advertise products and services. Unwanted emails are called spam. On Internet pages advertisers use banner ads (= advertisements across the top or bottom of a page), pop-ups (= pages that open in front of the page you are looking at) and links to their own websites to attract customers. Advertisements are also sent to mobile/​cell phones.Many people are against advertising, partly because it adds to the cost of a product. People also say that the influence of advertising is too great, and that children, especially, want every product they see advertised. On the other hand, many people buy American newspapers on Sundays because they advertise special offers and contain coupons (= pieces of paper enabling people to buy products at a reduced price). See related entries: Marketing
  3. 3  [often passive] to move somebody to a higher rank or more senior job promote somebody She worked hard and was soon promoted. promote somebody (from something) (to something) He has been promoted to sergeant. opposite demote
  4. 4promote something (from something) (to something) to move a sports team from playing with one group of teams to playing in a better group They were promoted to the First Division last season. opposite relegate
  5. Word Origin late Middle English: from Latin promot- ‘moved forward’, from the verb promovere, from pro- ‘forward, onward’ + movere ‘to move’.Extra examples Basketball stars have helped promote the sport overseas. Bonus payments to staff serve to promote commitment to the company. He was promoted from deputy minister to minister last year. He was promoted to the rank of captain. Human rights are strongly promoted by all our members. The company’s products have been promoted mainly through advertising in newspapers. The country is now being promoted as a travel destination. The idea of equal opportunities was strongly promoted by many Labour MPs. The new products have been very heavily promoted. They claimed that the authorities had deliberately promoted and condoned the violence. Young people’s awareness of agricultural issues is promoted through publicity material. a recently promoted headteacher measures designed to promote economic growth Basketball stars from the US have helped promote the sport in Italy and Spain. The aim of the culture festival is to promote friendship between the two countries. The church tries to promote racial harmony.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: promote