English

Definition of proposition noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    proposition

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//ˌprɒpəˈzɪʃn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌprɑːpəˈzɪʃn//
     
    Parliament
     
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  1. 1an idea or a plan of action that is suggested, especially in business I'd like to put a business proposition to you. He was trying to make it look like an attractive proposition.
  2. 2a thing that you intend to do; a problem or task to be dealt with synonym matter Getting a work permit in the UK is not always a simple proposition.
  3. 3(also Proposition) (in the US) a suggested change to the law that people can vote on How did you vote on Proposition 8? See related entries: Parliament
  4. 4(formal) a statement that expresses an opinion Her assessment is based on the proposition that power corrupts.
  5. 5(mathematics) a statement of a theorem, and an explanation of how it can be proved
  6. Word Origin Middle English: from Old French, from Latin propositio(n-), from the verb proponere ‘set forth’, from pro- ‘forward’ + ponere ‘put’.Extra examples He’s a different proposition from his father—much less tolerant. Ring up your agent in New York and put your proposition to him. Running the business was one thing. Getting it to make a profit was a different proposition altogether. The book puts forward a number of extreme propositions about the nature of language. First of all we need to examine whether this proposition is true. He was trying to make it look like an attractive proposition. Her argument is based on the proposition that power corrupts. I’d like to put a business proposition to you. Is that a viable proposition? We have a proposition to make.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: proposition

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