English

Definition of question noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    question

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//ˈkwestʃən//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈkwestʃən//
     
     
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  1. 1  [countable] a sentence, phrase or word that asks for information to ask/answer a question The question is, how much are they going to pay you? (formal) The question arises as to whether or not he knew of the situation. The key question of what caused the leak remains unanswered. (formal) He put a question to the minister about the recent reforms. I hope the police don't ask any awkward questions. The government doesn’t have the answers to these difficult questions. In an interview try to ask open questions that don't just need ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ as an answer. Express YourselfDealing with questionsIf you give a talk, for example at a conference, you need to explain to the audience when they can ask questions, and deal with the questions they ask: There will be time for questions at the end, if you'd like to save them up till then. If you don't mind, we'll take all of your questions at the end of the presentation. We've set aside/​We're saving the last 15 minutes for questions. If you have questions, please feel free to ask them as we go along. That's an interesting point. Perhaps I can answer it like this… I'm not sure I understand your question. If I understand your question correctly, what you're asking is… That's something we probably need to look into further. Does that answer your question? I hope that answers your question. Can I come back to that point later?
  2. 2  [countable] a task or request for information that is intended to test your knowledge or understanding, for example in an exam or a competition Question 3 was very difficult. In the exam there's sure to be a question on energy.
  3. 3  [countable] question (of something) a matter or topic that needs to be discussed or dealt with Let's look at the question of security. The question which needs to be addressed is one of funding. Which route is better remains an open question (= it is not decided).
  4. 4[uncountable] doubt or confusion about something Her honesty is beyond question. His suitability for the job is open to question. Her version of events was accepted without question.
  5. Word Origin late Middle English: from Old French question (noun), questionner (verb), from Latin quaestio(n-), from quaerere ‘ask, seek’.Extra examples Does anyone have any questions for our speaker? Don’t be afraid to ask questions as to why things are done in the way they are. Have any of the audience got questions for our speaker? He became embarrassed when a journalist asked him pointed questions about his finances. He easily evaded all the interviewer’s most probing questions. Her loyalty is beyond question. His sincerity is not in question. I couldn’t do Question 6. I did have some questions as to his motive in coming. I need to phrase my question rather carefully. I wanted to find out how old he was without asking him a direct question. I’d like to put a question to the first speaker. It does call into question the decision to send troops into the area. It was, without question, the worst day of my life. Now it’s just a question of getting the wording of the statement right. Now it’s just a question of getting the wording right. Only one question remains unanswered. She refused to answer questions about her private life. The chairperson fielded technical questions that she could not answer herself. The children bombarded us with questions. The former minister faced questions concerning his role in the affair. The government’s handling of the whole affair remains open to question. The interview panel fired questions at me from all angles. The judge told him not to ask the witness leading questions. The new play poses some challenging questions. There is no question about her enthusiasm for the job. We come now to the vexed question of pension rights. fundamental questions about the nature of our society one of the crucial questions for the jury questions of national security Does anyone in the audience have a question for our speaker? Her version of events was accepted without question. His suitability for the job is open to question. I hope the police don’t ask any awkward questions. In an interview try to ask open questions that don’t just need ‘Yes’ or ‘No’ as an answer. Let’s look at the question of security. Question 3 was quite difficult. The government doesn’t have the answers to these difficult questions. The incident brought into question the safety of travellers in the region. The question arises as to whether or not he knew of the situation. The question is, how much are they going to pay you? Which route is better remains an open question.Idioms
    1. 1to make somebody want to ask a question that has not yet been answered All of which begs the question as to who will fund the project.
    2. 2to talk about something as if it were definitely true, even though it might not be These assumptions beg the question that children learn languages more easily than adults.
    bring/throw something into question
     
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    to cause something to become a matter for doubt and discussion This case brings into question the whole purpose of the law.
    call something into question
     
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    to doubt something or make others doubt something synonym question His honesty has never been called into question.
    to become a matter for doubt and discussion (informal) used to show that you do not know the answer to a question ‘How much is all this going to cost?’ ‘Good question!’
    1. 1  that is being discussed On the day in question we were in Cardiff.
    2. 2  in doubt; uncertain The future of public transport is not in question.
    just/merely/only a question of (something/doing something)
     
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     used to say that something is not difficult to predict, explain, do, etc. It's merely a question of time before the business collapses. It's just a question of deciding what you really want.
    (British English, North American English) a matter about which there may be disagreement or confusion Whether this should be enforced by law or not is a moot point.  impossible or not allowed and therefore not worth discussing Another trip abroad this year is out of the question. (informal) to ask somebody to marry you
    there is/was no question of (something happening/somebody doing something)
     
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     there is/was no possibility of something There was no question of his/him cancelling the trip so near the departure date.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: question