English

Definition of radiate verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    radiate

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈreɪdieɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈreɪdieɪt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they radiate
    BrE BrE//ˈreɪdieɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈreɪdieɪt//
     
    he / she / it radiates
    BrE BrE//ˈreɪdieɪts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈreɪdieɪts//
     
    past simple radiated
    BrE BrE//ˈreɪdieɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈreɪdieɪtɪd//
     
    past participle radiated
    BrE BrE//ˈreɪdieɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈreɪdieɪtɪd//
     
    -ing form radiating
    BrE BrE//ˈreɪdieɪtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈreɪdieɪtɪŋ//
     
    Energy and physical forces
     
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  1. 1[transitive, intransitive] radiate (something) | radiate (from somebody) if a person radiates a particular quality or emotion, or if it radiates from them, people can see it very clearly He radiated self-confidence and optimism. the energy that seemed to radiate from her
  2. 2[intransitive, transitive] radiate (from something) | radiate (something) if something radiates heat, light or energy or heat, etc. radiates from it, the heat is sent out in all directions synonym give off something Heat radiates from the stove. See related entries: Energy and physical forces
  3. 3[intransitive] + adv./prep. (of lines, etc.) to spread out in all directions from a central point Five roads radiate from the square. The pain started in my stomach and radiated all over my body. the paths radiating out from the village
  4. Word Origin early 17th cent.: from Latin radiat- ‘emitted in rays’, from the verb radiare, from radius ‘ray, spoke’.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: radiate