English

Definition of recoil verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    recoil

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//rɪˈkɔɪl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈkɔɪl//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they recoil
    BrE BrE//rɪˈkɔɪl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈkɔɪl//
     
    he / she / it recoils
    BrE BrE//rɪˈkɔɪlz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈkɔɪlz//
     
    past simple recoiled
    BrE BrE//rɪˈkɔɪld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈkɔɪld//
     
    past participle recoiled
    BrE BrE//rɪˈkɔɪld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈkɔɪld//
     
    -ing form recoiling
    BrE BrE//rɪˈkɔɪlɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈkɔɪlɪŋ//
     
    Fear
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] to move your body quickly away from somebody/something because you find them or it frightening or unpleasant synonym flinch recoil (from somebody/something) She recoiled from his touch. recoil (at something) He recoiled in horror at the sight of the corpse. See related entries: Fear
  2. 2[intransitive] recoil (from something/from doing something) | recoil (at something) to react to an idea or a situation with strong dislike or fear synonym shrink She recoiled from the idea of betraying her own brother.
  3. 3[intransitive] (of a gun) to move suddenly backwards when you fire it
  4. Word Origin Middle English (denoting the act of retreating): from Old French reculer ‘move back’, based on Latin culus ‘buttocks’.Extra examples As he leaned towards her she instinctively recoiled. Carlos recoiled a little at the sharpness in my voice. He recoiled in apparent disgust. She felt him recoil from her, frightened.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: recoil

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