Definition of recruit verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    recruit

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//rɪˈkruːt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈkruːt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they recruit
    BrE BrE//rɪˈkruːt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈkruːt//
     
    he / she / it recruits
    BrE BrE//rɪˈkruːts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈkruːts//
     
    past simple recruited
    BrE BrE//rɪˈkruːtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈkruːtɪd//
     
    past participle recruited
    BrE BrE//rɪˈkruːtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈkruːtɪd//
     
    -ing form recruiting
    BrE BrE//rɪˈkruːtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈkruːtɪŋ//
     
    Job interviews
     
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  1. 1[transitive, intransitive] recruit (somebody) (to something) | recruit somebody to do something to find new people to join a company, an organization, the armed forces, etc. The police are trying to recruit more officers from ethnic minorities. They recruited several new members to the club. He's responsible for recruiting at all levels. CollocationsJobsGetting a job look for work look for/​apply for/​go for a job get/​pick up/​complete/​fill out/ (British English) fill in an application (form) send/​email your (British English) CV/(North American English) résumé/application/​application form/​covering letter be called for/​have/​attend an interview offer somebody a job/​work/​employment/​promotion find/​get/​land a job employ/ (especially North American English) hire/​recruit/ (especially British English) take on staff/​workers/​trainees recruit/​appoint a managerDoing a job arrive at/​get to/​leave work/​the office/​the factory start/​finish work/​your shift do/​put in/​work overtime have/​gain/​get/​lack/​need experience/​qualifications do/​get/​have/​receive training learn/​pick up/​improve/​develop (your) skills cope with/​manage/​share/​spread the workload improve your/​achieve a better work-life balance have (no) job satisfaction/​job securityBuilding a career have a job/​work/​a career/​a vocation find/​follow/​pursue/ (especially North American English) live (out) your vocation enter/​go into/​join a profession choose/​embark on/​start/​begin/​pursue a career change jobs/​profession/​career be/ (both especially British English) work/​go freelance do/​take on temp work/​freelance work do/​be engaged in/​be involved in voluntary workLeaving your job leave/ (especially North American English) quit/​resign from your job give up work/​your job/​your career hand in your notice/​resignation plan to/​be due to retire in June/​next year, etc. take early retirement See related entries: Job interviews
  2. 2[transitive] recruit somebody to do something to persuade somebody to do something, especially to help you We were recruited to help peel the vegetables.
  3. 3[transitive] recruit something to form a new army, team, etc. by persuading new people to join it to recruit a task force See related entries: Job interviews
  4. Word Origin mid 17th cent. (in the senses ‘fresh body of troops’ and ‘supplement the numbers in a group’): from obsolete French dialect recrute, based on Latin recrescere ‘grow again’, from re- ‘again’ + crescere ‘grow’.Extra examples A hundred patients were recruited for the study. GM recruited heavily in the South. Most of the workers will be recruited locally. Peter Watson has been recruited as Sales Manager. Senior managers are being aggressively recruited by companies. She personally recruited the teachers. Soldiers were recruited from the local villages. Some of the men were recruited into the army. Staff were recruited specially for the event. Ten new members were recruited to the committee. The specialist institutions directly recruit their own staff. a drive to recruit and retain federal employees He is responsible for recruiting at all levels.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: recruit

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