Definition of rehabilitate verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    rehabilitate

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˌriːəˈbɪlɪteɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌriːəˈbɪlɪteɪt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they rehabilitate
    BrE BrE//ˌriːəˈbɪlɪteɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌriːəˈbɪlɪteɪt//
     
    he / she / it rehabilitates
    BrE BrE//ˌriːəˈbɪlɪteɪts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌriːəˈbɪlɪteɪts//
     
    past simple rehabilitated
    BrE BrE//ˌriːəˈbɪlɪteɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌriːəˈbɪlɪteɪtɪd//
     
    past participle rehabilitated
    BrE BrE//ˌriːəˈbɪlɪteɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌriːəˈbɪlɪteɪtɪd//
     
    -ing form rehabilitating
    BrE BrE//ˌriːəˈbɪlɪteɪtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˌriːəˈbɪlɪteɪtɪŋ//
     
    Recovering from illness
     
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  1. 1rehabilitate somebody to help somebody to have a normal, useful life again after they have been very ill/sick or in prison for a long time a unit for rehabilitating drug addicts The new proposals involve rehabilitating even more patients for life outside hospital. See related entries: Recovering from illness
  2. 2rehabilitate somebody (as something) to begin to consider that somebody is good or acceptable after a long period during which they were considered bad or unacceptable He played a major role in rehabilitating Magritte as an artist.
  3. 3rehabilitate something to return a building or an area to its previous good condition Billions of pounds are being spent on rehabilitating inner-city areas.
  4. Word Origin late 16th cent. (earlier (late 15th cent.) as rehabilitation) (in the sense ‘restore to former privileges’): from medieval Latin rehabilitat-, from the verb rehabilitare (from re- and habilitate, from medieval Latin habilitat- ‘made able’, from the verb habilitare, from habilitas, from habilis ‘able’).
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: rehabilitate