Definition of rehearse verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    rehearse

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//rɪˈhɜːs//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈhɜːrs//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they rehearse
    BrE BrE//rɪˈhɜːs//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈhɜːrs//
     
    he / she / it rehearses
    BrE BrE//rɪˈhɜːsɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈhɜːrsɪz//
     
    past simple rehearsed
    BrE BrE//rɪˈhɜːst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈhɜːrst//
     
    past participle rehearsed
    BrE BrE//rɪˈhɜːst//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈhɜːrst//
     
    -ing form rehearsing
    BrE BrE//rɪˈhɜːsɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈhɜːrsɪŋ//
     
    Producing a play
     
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  1. 1[intransitive, transitive] to practise or make people practise a play, piece of music, etc. in preparation for a public performance rehearse (for something) We were given only two weeks to rehearse. rehearse something/somebody Today, we'll just be rehearsing the final scene. The actors were poorly rehearsed. See related entries: Producing a play
  2. 2[transitive] rehearse something to prepare in your mind or practise privately what you are going to do or say to somebody She walked along rehearsing her excuse for being late.
  3. 3[transitive] rehearse something (formal, usually disapproving) to repeat ideas or opinions that have often been expressed before
  4. Word Origin Middle English (in the sense ‘repeat aloud’): from Old French rehercier, perhaps from re- ‘again’ + hercer ‘to harrow’, from herse ‘harrow’ (see hearse).Extra examples He had his speech well rehearsed. She mentally rehearsed what she would say to Jeff. We’re rehearsing for the show. Today, we’ll just be rehearsing the final scene.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: rehearse