Definition of restore verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    restore

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//rɪˈstɔː(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈstɔːr//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they restore
    BrE BrE//rɪˈstɔː(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈstɔːr//
     
    he / she / it restores
    BrE BrE//rɪˈstɔːz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈstɔːrz//
     
    past simple restored
    BrE BrE//rɪˈstɔːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈstɔːrd//
     
    past participle restored
    BrE BrE//rɪˈstɔːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈstɔːrd//
     
    -ing form restoring
    BrE BrE//rɪˈstɔːrɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɪˈstɔːrɪŋ//
     
    Describing architecture, Historic buildings, The art world
     
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  1. 1  restore something (to somebody) to bring back a situation or feeling that existed before The measures are intended to restore public confidence in the economy. Order was quickly restored after the riots. Such kindness restores your faith in human nature (= makes you believe most people are kind). The operation restored his sight (= made him able to see again).
  2. 2  restore somebody/something to something to bring somebody/something back to a former condition, place or position He is now fully restored to health. We hope to restore the garden to its former glory (= make it as beautiful as it used to be). This cream claims to restore your skin to its youthful condition.
  3. 3  restore something to repair a building, work of art, piece of furniture, etc. so that it looks as good as it did originally Her job is restoring old paintings. The house has been lovingly restored to the way it looked in 1900 when it was built. See related entries: Describing architecture, Historic buildings, The art world
  4. 4restore something to bring a law, tradition, way of working, etc. back into use synonym reintroduce to restore ancient traditions Some people argue that the death penalty should be restored.
  5. 5restore something (to somebody/something) (formal) to give something that was lost or stolen back to somebody The police have now restored the painting to its rightful owner.
  6. Word Origin Middle English: from Old French restorer, from Latin restaurare ‘rebuild, restore’.Extra examples Full diplomatic relations have now been restored. Order was quickly restored. Peace has now been restored to the area. She was now restored to health and ready to go back to work. The army restored him to the throne. The buildings have now been restored to their former glory. The film has been digitally restored and remastered. The interior has recently been extensively restored. The train has been restored to full working order. Troops were sent to the area to restore order. We need to restore public confidence in the industry. an attempt to restore the company’s finances The house has been lovingly restored to the way it looked in 1900.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: restore