English

Definition of roar verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    roar

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//rɔː(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɔːr//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they roar
    BrE BrE//rɔː(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɔːr//
     
    he / she / it roars
    BrE BrE//rɔːz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɔːrz//
     
    past simple roared
    BrE BrE//rɔːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɔːrd//
     
    past participle roared
    BrE BrE//rɔːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//rɔːrd//
     
    -ing form roaring
    BrE BrE//ˈrɔːrɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈrɔːrɪŋ//
     
    Driving
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] to make a very loud, deep sound We heard a lion roar. The gun roared deafeningly. The engine roared to life (= started noisily). The wind was roaring in my ears.
  2. 2[intransitive, transitive] to shout something very loudly The crowd roared. roar something (out) The fans roared (out) their approval. He roared out James’s name. + speech ‘Stand back,’ he roared.
  3. 3[intransitive] to laugh very loudly He looked so funny, we all roared. roar with laughter It made them roar with laughter.
  4. 4[intransitive] + adv./prep. (of a vehicle or its rider/driver) to move very fast, making a lot of noise She put her foot down and the car roared away. A group of young men on motorcycles roared past. See related entries: Driving
  5. 5[intransitive] (of a fire) to burn brightly with a lot of flames, heat and noise A log fire was roaring in the hearth.
  6. Word Origin Old English rārian (verb), imitative of a deep prolonged cry, of West Germanic origin; related to German röhren. The noun dates from late Middle English.Extra examples Fans roared their approval. The crowd roared with excitement. The engine roared to life. The man roared in pain and fury as he tried to get to his feet.Idioms
    roar, romp, sweep, etc. to victory
     
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    to win something easily He swept to victory in the final of the championship. See related entries: Conflict
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: roar

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