English

Definition of rout verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

rout

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//raʊt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//raʊt//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they rout
BrE BrE//raʊt//
 
; NAmE NAmE//raʊt//
 
he / she / it routs
BrE BrE//raʊts//
 
; NAmE NAmE//raʊts//
 
past simple routed
BrE BrE//ˈraʊtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈraʊtɪd//
 
past participle routed
BrE BrE//ˈraʊtɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈraʊtɪd//
 
-ing form routing
BrE BrE//ˈraʊtɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˈraʊtɪŋ//
 
 
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rout somebody to defeat somebody completely in a competition, a battle, etc. The Buffalo Bills routed the Atlanta Falcons 41–14. Word Origin Middle English: ultimately based on Latin ruptus ‘broken’, from the verb rumpere; the current senses (late 16th cent.) are from obsolete French route, probably from Italian rotta ‘break-up of an army’; the other senses are via Anglo-Norman French rute.Extra examples He resigned after being routed in the leadership election. The Royalist forces were routed. The massed army of conscripts had been enough to rout their opponents.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: rout

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