Definition of schedule noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

        

    schedule

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//ˈskedʒuːl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈskedʒuːl//
     
    ; BrE also BrE//ˈʃedʒuːl//
     
    , also BrE//ˈʃedjuːl//
     
    Radio broadcasting, Business meetings, Producing TV shows, Office life, School life
     
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  1. 1  [countable, uncountable] a plan that lists all the work that you have to do and when you must do each thing I have a hectic schedule for the next few days. We're working to a tight schedule (= we have a lot of things to do in a short time). Filming began on schedule (= at the planned time). The new bridge has been finished two years ahead of schedule. The tunnel project has already fallen behind schedule. We are trying desperately to keep to our schedule. See related entries: Business meetings, Office life
  2. 2  [countable] (North American English) = timetable a train schedule Chinese will be on the school schedule from next year. See related entries: School life
  3. 3[countable] a list of the television and radio programmes that are on a particular channel and the times that they start The channel's schedules are filled with old films and repeats. Channel 4 has published its spring schedules. See related entries: Radio broadcasting, Producing TV shows
  4. 4[countable] a written list of things, for example prices, rates or conditions tax schedules Which Word?agenda / diary / schedule / timetable A book with a space for each day where you write down things that you have to do in the future is called a diary or a datebook (North American English) (not an agenda). You may also have a calendar on your desk or hanging up in your room, where you write down your appointments. A diary or a journal is also the record that some people keep of what has happened during the day:The Diary of Anne Frank. In British English your schedule is a plan that lists all the work that you have to do and when you must do each thing and a timetable is a list showing the fixed times at which events will happen:a bus/​train timetable. In North American English these are both called a schedule.
  5. Word Origin late Middle English (in the sense ‘scroll, explanatory note, appendix’): from Old French cedule, from late Latin schedula ‘slip of paper’, diminutive of scheda, from Greek skhedē ‘papyrus leaf’. The verb dates from the mid 19th cent.Extra examples Allow time in the schedule for sickness. At this stage everything is going according to schedule. Connor checked the bus schedules for the day. I’m trying to fit everything into my busy schedule. She has a very demanding schedule. The president took time out of his busy schedule to visit our school. The project is right on schedule. We had to work a lot of overtime to meet the strict production schedule. We have a tight schedule to keep. We’re five days off schedule. We’re starting to slip behind schedule. disruptions to flight schedules caused by the strike Filming began on schedule. The new bridge has been finished two years ahead of schedule. The show trebled ratings for the channel’s afternoon schedule. The tunnel project has already fallen behind schedule. What’s your schedule like next semester? a bus/​flight/​train schedule
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: schedule

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