English

Definition of segregate verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    segregate

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈseɡrɪɡeɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈseɡrɪɡeɪt//
     
    (formal)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they segregate
    BrE BrE//ˈseɡrɪɡeɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈseɡrɪɡeɪt//
     
    he / she / it segregates
    BrE BrE//ˈseɡrɪɡeɪts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈseɡrɪɡeɪts//
     
    past simple segregated
    BrE BrE//ˈseɡrɪɡeɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈseɡrɪɡeɪtɪd//
     
    past participle segregated
    BrE BrE//ˈseɡrɪɡeɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈseɡrɪɡeɪtɪd//
     
    -ing form segregating
    BrE BrE//ˈseɡrɪɡeɪtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈseɡrɪɡeɪtɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1segregate somebody (from somebody) to separate people of different races, religions or sexes and treat them in a different way a culture in which women are segregated from men Whites and blacks were segregated into different parts of town. a racially segregated community a segregated school (= one for students of one race or religion only) opposite integrate
  2. 2segregate something (from something) to keep one thing separate from another In all our restaurants, smoking and non-smoking areas are segregated from each other.
  3. Word Origin mid 16th cent.: from Latin segregat- ‘separated from the flock’, from the verb segregare, from se- ‘apart’ + grex, greg- ‘flock’.Extra examples The club was segregated into smoking and non-smoking areas. The women were segregated from the male workers in the factory. Women’s work has always been highly segregated. racially segregated schools It is a culture in which women are segregated from men. The government is in favour of segregated schools. This is perhaps the most racially segregated city in the United States.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: segregate