Definition of shock verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    shock

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ʃɒk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ʃɑːk//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they shock
    BrE BrE//ʃɒk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ʃɑːk//
     
    he / she / it shocks
    BrE BrE//ʃɒks//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ʃɑːks//
     
    past simple shocked
    BrE BrE//ʃɒkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ʃɒkt//
     
    past participle shocked
    BrE BrE//ʃɒkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ʃɒkt//
     
    -ing form shocking
    BrE BrE//ˈʃɒkɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈʃɑːkɪŋ//
     
    Surprise
     
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    surprise and upset
  1. 1  [transitive, often passive] to surprise and upset somebody shock somebody It shocks you when something like that happens. We were all shocked at the news of his death. shock somebody that… Neighbours were shocked that such an attack could happen in their area. shock somebody to do something I was shocked to hear that he had resigned. Synonymsshockappal horrify disgust sicken repelThese words all mean to surprise and upset somebody very much.shock [often passive] to surprise somebody, usually in a way that upsets them:We were all shocked at the news of his death.appal/​appall to shock and upset somebody very much:The brutality of the crime has appalled the public.horrify to make somebody feel extremely shocked, upset or frightened:The whole country was horrified by the killings.disgust to make somebody feel shocked and almost ill because something is so unpleasant:The level of violence in the movie really disgusted me.sicken (British English) to make somebody feel very shocked, angry and almost ill because something is so unpleasant:The public is becoming sickened by these images of violence and death.repel [often passive] (rather formal) to make somebody feel rather disgusted:I was repelled by the smell of drink on his breath.Patterns shocked/​appalled/​horrified/​disgusted at somebody/​something to shock/​appal/​horrify/​disgust somebody that… to shock/​appal/​horrify/​disgust/​sicken somebody to think/​see/​hear… somebody’s behaviour shocks/​appals somebody violence/​an idea shocks/​appals/​horrifies/​disgusts somebody See related entries: Surprise
  2. offend/disgust
  3. 2  [intransitive, transitive] (of bad language, immoral behaviour, etc.) to make somebody feel offended or disgusted These movies deliberately set out to shock. shock somebody (to do something) She enjoys shocking people by saying outrageous things.
  4. Word Originverb mid 16th cent.: from French choc (noun), choquer (verb), of unknown origin. The original senses were ‘throw (troops) into confusion by charging at them’ and ‘an encounter between charging forces’, giving rise to the notion of ‘sudden violent blow or impact’.Extra examples He had old-fashioned ideas and was easily shocked. The news had shocked her deeply. The news shocked her into action. I was shocked to hear that he had resigned. Neighbours were shocked that such an attack could happen in their area.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: shock