Definition of shudder verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    shudder

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈʃʌdə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈʃʌdər//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they shudder
    BrE BrE//ˈʃʌdə(r)//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈʃʌdər//
     
    he / she / it shudders
    BrE BrE//ˈʃʌdəz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈʃʌdərz//
     
    past simple shuddered
    BrE BrE//ˈʃʌdəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈʃʌdərd//
     
    past participle shuddered
    BrE BrE//ˈʃʌdəd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈʃʌdərd//
     
    -ing form shuddering
    BrE BrE//ˈʃʌdərɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈʃʌdərɪŋ//
     
    Fear
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] to shake because you are cold or frightened, or because of a strong feeling Just thinking about the accident makes me shudder. shudder with something Alone in the car, she shuddered with fear. shudder at something I shuddered at the thought of all the trouble I'd caused. shudder to do something I shudder to think how much this is all going to cost (= I don't want to think about it because it is too unpleasant). See related entries: Fear
  2. 2[intransitive] (of a vehicle, machine, etc.) to shake very hard The bus shuddered to a halt. The floor was shuddering beneath us.
  3. Word Origin Middle English (as a verb): from Middle Dutch schūderen, from a Germanic base meaning ‘shake’.Extra examples A deep sigh shuddered through her body. His whole body shuddered with fury. I shuddered at the thought of going back to school. Joe shuddered in disgust. She shuddered at the memory of school exams. She shuddered involuntarily as he approached her. The sight of the dead body made them shudder. I shudder to think what might have happened. The boat’s engines shuddered, and it began to leave the shore. The plane was lurching and shuddering in the storm.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: shudder

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