English

Definition of signal verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    signal

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈsɪɡnəl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsɪɡnəl//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they signal
    BrE BrE//ˈsɪɡnəl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsɪɡnəl//
     
    he / she / it signals
    BrE BrE//ˈsɪɡnəlz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsɪɡnəlz//
     
    past simple signalled
    BrE BrE//ˈsɪɡnəld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsɪɡnəld//
     
    past participle signalled
    BrE BrE//ˈsɪɡnəld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsɪɡnəld//
     
    (US English) past simple signaled
    BrE BrE//ˈsɪɡnəld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsɪɡnəld//
     
    (US English) past participle signaled
    BrE BrE//ˈsɪɡnəld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsɪɡnəld//
     
    -ing form signalling
    BrE BrE//ˈsɪɡnəlɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsɪɡnəlɪŋ//
     
    (US English) -ing form signaling
    BrE BrE//ˈsɪɡnəlɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsɪɡnəlɪŋ//
     
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1  [intransitive, transitive] to make a movement or sound to give somebody a message, an order, etc. Don't fire until I signal. Did you signal before you turned right? signal (to somebody) (for something) He signalled to the waiter for the bill. signal to/for somebody to do something He signalled to us to join him. The patrolman signalled for her to stop. signal somebody to do something She signalled him to follow. signal something The referee signalled a foul. signal (that)… She signalled (that) it was time to leave. signal which, what, etc… You must signal which way you are going to turn.
  2. 2[transitive] signal something to be a sign that something exists or is likely to happen synonym indicate This announcement signalled a clear change of policy. The scandal surely signals the end of his political career.
  3. 3[transitive] to do something to make your feelings or opinions known signal something He signalled his discontent by refusing to vote. signal (that)… She has signalled (that) she is willing to stand as a candidate. More Like This Consonant-doubling verbs bob, club, dub, grab, rub, sob, throb kid, nod, pad, plod, prod, shred, skid, thud beg, blog, bug, drag, drug, flag, hug, jog, log, mug, nag, plug bar, confer, infer, occur, prefer, refer, star, stir, transfer acquit, admit, allot, chat, clot, commit, jut, knit, pat, regret, rot, spot, submit (in British English:) appal, cancel, channel, control, counsel, enrol, equal, excel, fuel, fulfil, label, level, marvel, model, pedal, quarrel, signal, travelSee worksheet.
  4. Word Originverb late Middle English: from Old French, from medieval Latin signale, neuter of late Latin signalis, from Latin signum ‘mark, token’. The verb dates from the early 19th cent.Extra examples A change of mind in one instance does not necessarily signal a change in overall policy. A fall in demand does not necessarily signal the death of the industry. He raised his hand and signalled for the waiter. I saw her signal frantically to us. She signalled frantically to us. She signalled to the bus driver to stop. These changes clearly signal the end of the welfare state as we know it. These events appeared to signal the end of an era. This address was meant to signal a change in policy. Always make sure you signal before you start to turn. Don’t fire until I signal. Joe signalled to us to join him. Many animals use their tails to signal. She signalled that it was time to leave. The referee seemed to be signalling a foul. When I’m ready I’ll signal with a flashlight.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: signal