Definition of slate verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    slate

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//sleɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//sleɪt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they slate
    BrE BrE//sleɪt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//sleɪt//
     
    he / she / it slates
    BrE BrE//sleɪts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//sleɪts//
     
    past simple slated
    BrE BrE//ˈsleɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsleɪtɪd//
     
    past participle slated
    BrE BrE//ˈsleɪtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsleɪtɪd//
     
    -ing form slating
    BrE BrE//ˈsleɪtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsleɪtɪŋ//
     
    Journalism
     
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  1. 1slate somebody/something (for something) (British English) to criticize somebody/something, especially in a newspaper to slate a book/play/writer The critics slated his latest production. She was universally slated for her much-publicized views on marriage. See related entries: Journalism
  2. 2[usually passive] to plan that something will happen at a particular time in the future slate something for something The next conference is slated for July. The houses were first slated for demolition five years ago. slate something to do something The new store is slated to open in spring.
  3. 3[usually passive] (informal, especially North American English) to suggest or choose somebody for a job, position, etc. slate somebody for something I was told that I was being slated for promotion. slate somebody to do something He is slated to play the lead in the new musical.
  4. Word Origin Middle English sclate, sklate, shortening of Old French esclate, feminine synonymous with esclat ‘piece broken off’, from esclater ‘to split’. Sense (2) of the verb arose from the practice of noting a name on a writing slate.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: slate