Definition of slog verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    slog

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//slɒɡ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//slɑːɡ//
     
    (informal)Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they slog
    BrE BrE//slɒɡ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//slɑːɡ//
     
    he / she / it slogs
    BrE BrE//slɒɡz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//slɑːɡz//
     
    past simple slogged
    BrE BrE//slɒɡd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//slɑːɡd//
     
    past participle slogged
    BrE BrE//slɒɡd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//slɑːɡd//
     
    -ing form slogging
    BrE BrE//ˈslɒɡɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈslɑːɡɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[intransitive, transitive] to work hard and steadily at something, especially something that takes a long time and is boring or difficult slog (away) (at something) He's been slogging away at that piece of music for weeks. slog (through something) The teacher made us slog through long lists of vocabulary. My mother slogged all her life for us. slog your way through something She slogged her way through four piles of ironing.
  2. 2[intransitive, transitive] to walk or travel somewhere steadily, with great effort or difficulty + adv./prep. I've been slogging around the streets of London all day. slog your way through something He started to slog his way through the undergrowth.
  3. 3[transitive, intransitive] slog (something) (+ adv./prep.) to hit a ball very hard but often without skill
  4. Word Origin early 19th cent.: of unknown origin; compare with the verb slug.Idioms
    slog/sweat/work your guts out
     
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    (informal) to work very hard to achieve something I slogged my guts out for the exam.
    (British English, informal) to fight or compete in order to prove who is the strongest, the best, etc. The party leaders are slogging it out in a TV debate.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: slog