Definition of smoke verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    smoke

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//sməʊk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//smoʊk//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they smoke
    BrE BrE//sməʊk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//smoʊk//
     
    he / she / it smokes
    BrE BrE//sməʊks//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//smoʊks//
     
    past simple smoked
    BrE BrE//sməʊkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//smoʊkt//
     
    past participle smoked
    BrE BrE//sməʊkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//smoʊkt//
     
    -ing form smoking
    BrE BrE//ˈsməʊkɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈsmoʊkɪŋ//
     
    Addiction
     
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  1. 1  [transitive, intransitive] smoke (something) to suck smoke from a cigarette, pipe, etc. into your mouth and let it out again He was smoking a large cigar. How many cigarettes do you smoke a day? Do you mind if I smoke? See related entries: Addiction
  2. 2  [intransitive] to use cigarettes, etc. in this way as a habit Do you smoke? She smokes heavily. I’ve never smoked. You’re too young to smoke. He smokes like a chimney (= a lot). see also chain-smoke See related entries: Addiction
  3. 3  [intransitive] to produce smoke smoking factory chimneys the smoking remains of burnt-out cars This fireplace smokes badly (= sends smoke into the room instead of up the chimney).
  4. 4  [transitive, usually passive] smoke something to preserve meat or fish by hanging it in smoke from wood fires to give it a special taste smoked salmon
  5. Word Origin Old English smoca (noun), smocian (verb), from the Germanic base of smēocan ‘emit smoke’; related to Dutch smook and German Schmauch.Extra examples He has always smoked heavily. He smokes like a chimney. The ham is cured, then lightly smoked. You see kids openly smoking in the streets. Phrasal Verbssmoke out somebody
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: smoke