Definition of spike verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    spike

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//spaɪk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//spaɪk//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they spike
    BrE BrE//spaɪk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//spaɪk//
     
    he / she / it spikes
    BrE BrE//spaɪks//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//spaɪks//
     
    past simple spiked
    BrE BrE//spaɪkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//spaɪkt//
     
    past participle spiked
    BrE BrE//spaɪkt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//spaɪkt//
     
    -ing form spiking
    BrE BrE//ˈspaɪkɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈspaɪkɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[transitive] spike somebody/something (on something) to push a sharp piece of metal, wood, etc. into somebody/something; to injure something on a sharp point synonym stab
  2. 2[transitive] spike something (with something) to add alcohol, poison or a drug to somebody’s drink or food without them knowing He gave her a drink spiked with tranquillizers. (figurative) Her words were spiked with malice. She suspected that her drink had been spiked.
  3. 3[transitive] spike something to reject something that a person has written or said; to prevent something from happening or being made public The article was spiked for fear of legal action against the newspaper.
  4. 4[intransitive] spike (to something) (especially North American English) to rise quickly and reach a high value The US dollar spiked to a three-month high.
  5. Word Originverb Middle English: perhaps from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch spiker, related to spoke. The verb dates from the early 17th cent.Idioms
    spike somebody’s guns
     
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    (British English) to spoil the plans of an opponent
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: spike