English

Definition of squat verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    squat

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//skwɒt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//skwɑːt//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they squat
    BrE BrE//skwɒt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//skwɑːt//
     
    he / she / it squats
    BrE BrE//skwɒts//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//skwɑːts//
     
    past simple squatted
    BrE BrE//ˈskwɒtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈskwɑːtɪd//
     
    past participle squatted
    BrE BrE//ˈskwɒtɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈskwɑːtɪd//
     
    -ing form squatting
    BrE BrE//ˈskwɒtɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈskwɑːtɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[intransitive] squat (down) to sit on your heels with your knees bent up close to your body Children were squatting on the floor. When we saw them we squatted down behind a wall.
  2. 2[intransitive, transitive] squat (something) to live in a building or on land which is not yours, without the owner’s permission They ended up squatting in the empty houses on Oxford Road. Wordfinderaccommodation, deed, home, house, lease, let, location, mortgage, squat, tenant
  3. Word Origin Middle English (in the sense ‘thrust down with force’): from Old French esquatir ‘flatten’, based on Latin coactus, past participle of cogere ‘compel’, from co- ‘together’ + agere ‘drive’ The current sense of the adjective dates from the mid 17th cent.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: squat