Definition of start noun from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    start

     noun
    noun
    BrE BrE//stɑːt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//stɑːrt//
     
     
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    beginning
  1. 1  [countable, usually singular] the point at which something begins a perfect start to the day Things didn't look too hopeful at the start of the year. If we don't hurry, we'll miss the start of the game. The meeting got off to a good/bad start(= started well/badly). The trip was a disaster from start to finish. We’ve had problems (right) from the start. (informal) This could be the start of something big.
  2. 2  [singular] the act or process of beginning something I'll paint the ceiling if you make a start on the walls. I want to make an early start in the morning. She's moving abroad to make a fresh start (= to begin a new life). see also false start, kick-start
  3. opportunity
  4. 3  [countable, usually singular] the opportunity that you are given to begin something in a successful way They worked hard to give their children a good start in life. The job gave him his start in journalism.
  5. in race
  6. 4the start [singular] the place where a race begins The runners lined up at the start.
  7. 5[countable, usually singular] an amount of time or distance that somebody has as an advantage over other people at the beginning of a race She went into the second round with a five-minute start on the rest of the cyclists. I gave the younger children a start. see also head start
  8. 6[countable, usually plural] (sport) a race or competition that somebody has taken part in She has been beaten only once in six starts.
  9. sudden movement
  10. 7[countable, usually singular] an act of moving your body quickly and suddenly because you are surprised, afraid, etc. She woke from the dream with a start. You gave me quite a start!
  11. Word Origin Old English styrtan ‘to caper, leap’, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch storten ‘push’ and German stürzen ‘fall headlong, fling’. From the sense ‘sudden movement’ arose the sense ‘initiation of movement, setting out on a journey’ and hence ‘beginning of a process, etc.’.Extra examples All parents want to give their kids a head start in life. Despite a bright start, Liverpool lost the match. Despite a promising start, we lost the game. Everyone was in a conciliatory mood at the start of the meeting. He joined the team prior to the start of the season. I clicked the icon in the start menu. I think it’s time we made a start. Moving to a good school gave Sally a fresh start in life. She felt at home in her new job right from the start. The company got off to an impressive start this year. The fine winter weather heralded a good start to the year. The project was doomed from the start. The runners walked up to the start line. The space project went from a standing start to the moon in ten years. This is a thoroughly good book from start to finish. right from the very start I’ll paint the ceiling if you make a start on the walls. If we don’t hurry, we’ll miss the start of the game. She’s moving abroad to make a fresh start. The meeting got off to a good/​bad start. The trip was a disaster from start to finish. They worked hard to give their children a good start in life. We’ve had problems (right) from the start. What a perfect start to the day!Idioms frequently starting and stopping again; not continuously Because of other commitments I can only write my book in fits and starts. (informal) used to emphasize the first of a list of reasons, opinions, etc. I'm not working there—for a start, it's too far to travel.
    get off to a flying start, get off to a flyer
     
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    to make a very good start; to begin something well She’s got off to a flying start in her new career.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: start