Definition of storm verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    storm

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//stɔːm//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//stɔːrm//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they storm
    BrE BrE//stɔːm//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//stɔːrm//
     
    he / she / it storms
    BrE BrE//stɔːmz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//stɔːrmz//
     
    past simple stormed
    BrE BrE//stɔːmd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//stɔːrmd//
     
    past participle stormed
    BrE BrE//stɔːmd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//stɔːrmd//
     
    -ing form storming
    BrE BrE//ˈstɔːmɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈstɔːrmɪŋ//
     
    Anger, Conflict
     
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  1. 1[transitive, intransitive] to suddenly attack a place storm something Police stormed the building and captured the gunman. The embassy was stormed by demonstrators. storm into something Soldiers stormed into the city at dawn. See related entries: Conflict
  2. 2[intransitive] + adv./prep. to go somewhere quickly and in an angry, noisy way She stormed into my office waving a newspaper. He burst into tears and stormed off. See related entries: Anger
  3. 3[transitive] + speech to say something in a loud angry way ‘Don't you know who I am?’ she stormed. See related entries: Anger
  4. Word Origin Old English, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch storm and German Sturm, probably also to the verb stir. The verb dates from late Middle English.Extra examples Apparently she stormed out of the meeting after only 15 minutes. Chris stormed into my office waving a newspaper. He thumped the table and then stormed off. She stormed from the room, slamming the door behind her.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: storm