English

Definition of strain verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    strain

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//streɪn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//streɪn//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they strain
    BrE BrE//streɪn//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//streɪn//
     
    he / she / it strains
    BrE BrE//streɪnz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//streɪnz//
     
    past simple strained
    BrE BrE//streɪnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//streɪnd//
     
    past participle strained
    BrE BrE//streɪnd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//streɪnd//
     
    -ing form straining
    BrE BrE//ˈstreɪnɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈstreɪnɪŋ//
     
     
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    injure
  1. 1[transitive] strain something/yourself to injure yourself or part of your body by making it work too hard to strain a muscle You’ll strain your back carrying those heavy suitcases. Synonymsinjurewound hurt bruise sprain pull strainThese words all mean to harm yourself or somebody else physically, especially in an accident.injure to harm yourself or somebody else physically, especially in an accident:He injured his knee playing hockey. Three people were injured in the crash.wound [often passive] (rather formal) to injure part of the body, especially by making a hole in the skin using a weapon:50 people were seriously wounded in the attack. Wound is often used to talk about people being hurt in war or in other attacks which affect a lot of people.hurt to cause physical pain to somebody/​yourself; to injure somebody/​yourself:Did you hurt yourself?injure or hurt?You can hurt or injure a part of the body in an accident. Hurt emphasizes the physical pain caused; injure emphasizes that the part of the body has been damaged in some way.bruise to make a blue, brown or purple mark (= a bruise) appear on the skin after somebody has fallen or been hit; to develop a bruisesprain to injure part of your body, especially your ankle, wrist or knee, by suddenly bending it in an awkward way, causing pain and swellingpull to damage a muscle, etc, by using too much forcestrain to injure yourself or part of your body by making it work too hard:Don’t strain your eyes by reading in poor light.Patterns to injure/​hurt/​strain yourself to injure/​hurt/​sprain/​pull/​strain a muscle to injure/​hurt/​sprain your ankle/​foot/​knee/​wrist/​hand to injure/​hurt/​strain your back/​shoulder/​eyes to injure/​hurt your spine/​neck to be badly/​severely/​slightly injured/​wounded/​hurt/​bruised/​sprained CollocationsInjuriesBeing injured have a fall/​an injury receive/​suffer/​sustain a serious injury/​a hairline fracture/(especially British English) whiplash/​a gunshot wound hurt/​injure your ankle/​back/​leg damage the brain/​an ankle ligament/​your liver/​the optic nerve/​the skin pull/​strain/​tear a hamstring/​ligament/​muscle/​tendon sprain/​twist your ankle/​wrist break a bone/​your collarbone/​your leg/​three ribs fracture/​crack your skull break/​chip/​knock out/​lose a tooth burst/​perforate your eardrum dislocate your finger/​hip/​jaw/​shoulder bruise/​cut/​graze your arm/​knee/​shoulder burn/​scald yourself/​your tongue bang/​bump/​hit/ (informal) bash your elbow/​head/​knee (on/​against something)Treating injuries treat somebody for burns/​a head injury/​a stab wound examine/​clean/​dress/​bandage/​treat a bullet wound repair a damaged/​torn ligament/​tendon/​cartilage amputate/​cut off an arm/​a finger/​a foot/​a leg/​a limb put on/ (formal) apply/​take off (especially North American English) a Band-Aid™/(British English) a plaster/​a bandage need/​require/​put in/ (especially British English) have (out)/ (North American English) get (out) stitches put on/​rub on/ (formal) apply cream/​ointment/​lotion have/​receive/​undergo (British English) physiotherapy/(North American English) physical therapy
  2. make effort
  3. 2[transitive, intransitive] to make an effort to do something, using all your mental or physical strength strain something to do something I strained my ears (= listened very hard) to catch what they were saying. strain something Necks were strained for a glimpse of the stranger. strain to do something People were straining to see what was going on. strain (something) (for something) He burst to the surface, straining for air. Bend gently to the left without straining.
  4. stretch to limit
  5. 3[transitive] strain something to try to make something do more than it is able to do The sudden influx of visitors is straining hotels in the town to the limit. His constant complaints were straining our patience. The dispute has strained relations between the two countries (= made them difficult). Her latest version of events strained their credulity still further.
  6. push/pull hard
  7. 4[intransitive] + adv./prep. to push hard against something; to pull hard on something She strained against the ropes that held her. The dogs were straining at the leash, eager to get to the park.
  8. separate solid from liquid
  9. 5[transitive] to pour food, etc. through something with very small holes in it, for example a sieve, in order to separate the solid part from the liquid part strain something Use a colander to strain the vegetables. strain something off Strain off any excess liquid.
  10. Word Originverb Middle English (as a verb): from Old French estreindre, from Latin stringere ‘draw tight’. Current senses of the noun arose in the mid 16th cent.Extra examples I strained forward to get a better view. Our public health laboratories are strained to (the) breaking point. Several men were straining at a rope, trying to move the stalled vehicle. The company is already straining under the weight of a $12 billion debt. The dispute severely strained relations between the two countries. The dogs were straining against the sled. Their ears strained for any slight sound. We had to strain to hear what was being said. You could see he was straining hard to understand. Are you sure you can carry all that? Don’t strain yourself. Don’t strain your eyes by reading in poor light. Strain the juice from the cherries into a small saucepan. You’ll strain your back carrying those heavy suitcases.Idioms if a system or service creaks under the strain, it cannot deal effectively with all the things it is expected to do or provide (informal) to want to do something very much Like all youngsters, he's straining at the leash to leave home.
    strain every nerve/sinew (to do something)
     
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    (formal) to try as hard as you can to do something He strained every nerve to snatch victory from defeat.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: strain