Definition of strange adjective from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    strange

     adjective
    adjective
    BrE BrE//streɪndʒ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//streɪndʒ//
     
    (stranger, strangest)
     
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  1. 1  unusual or surprising, especially in a way that is difficult to understand A strange thing happened this morning. She was looking at me in a very strange way. strange (that)… It’s strange (that) we haven’t heard from him. strange (how…) It's strange how childhood impressions linger. That's strange—the front door's open. I'm looking forward to the exam, strange as it may seem. There was something strange about her eyes. Strange to say, I don't really enjoy television.
  2. 2  not familiar because you have not been there before or met the person before a strange city to wake up in a strange bed Never accept lifts from strange men. strange to somebody At first the place was strange to me.
  3. Word Origin Middle English: shortening of Old French estrange, from Latin extraneus ‘external, strange’.Extra examples He’s nice, but a little strange. His actions were regarded as very strange. Their accent was strange to her ears. I’m looking forward to the exam, strange as it may seem. It’s strange (that) we haven’t heard from him. It’s strange how childhood impressions linger. Never accept rides from strange men. She woke up in a strange bed in a strange room. Strange to say, I don’t really enjoy television. Suddenly I heard a strange noise. That’s strange—the front door’s open.Idioms  to not feel comfortable in a situation; to have an unpleasant physical feeling She felt strange sitting at her father's desk. It was terribly hot and I started to feel strange.
    truth is stranger than fiction
     
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    (saying) used to say that things that actually happen are often more surprising than stories that are invented
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: strange

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