Definition of succeed verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    succeed

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//səkˈsiːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//səkˈsiːd//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they succeed
    BrE BrE//səkˈsiːd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//səkˈsiːd//
     
    he / she / it succeeds
    BrE BrE//səkˈsiːdz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//səkˈsiːdz//
     
    past simple succeeded
    BrE BrE//səkˈsiːdɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//səkˈsiːdɪd//
     
    past participle succeeded
    BrE BrE//səkˈsiːdɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//səkˈsiːdɪd//
     
    -ing form succeeding
    BrE BrE//səkˈsiːdɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//səkˈsiːdɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1  [intransitive] to achieve something that you have been trying to do or get; to have the result or effect that was intended Our plan succeeded. succeed in doing something He succeeded in getting a place at art school. I tried to discuss it with her but only succeeded in making her angry (= I failed and did the opposite of what I intended). see also success
  2. 2  [intransitive] to be successful in your job, earning money, power, respect, etc. You will have to work hard if you are to succeed. succeed in something She doesn't have the ruthlessness required to succeed in business. succeed as something He had hoped to succeed as a violinist. see also success
  3. 3[transitive] succeed somebody/something to come next after somebody/something and take their/its place or position synonym follow Who succeeded Kennedy as President? Their early success was succeeded by a period of miserable failure. Strands of DNA are reproduced through succeeding generations. see also succession
  4. 4[intransitive] succeed (to something) to gain the right to a title, property, etc. when somebody dies She succeeded to the throne (= became queen) in 1558. He had no right to succeed to the tenancy when his father died. see also succession
  5. Word Origin late Middle English: from Old French succeder or Latin succedere ‘come close after’, from sub- ‘close to’ + cedere ‘go’.Extra examples He was appointed to succeed Sir Georg Solti as head of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. He was appointed to succeed Solti as head of the orchestra. He was expected to succeed Jack Smith as CEO when he retired. He was widely tipped to succeed William Hague as leader of the party. No company can hope to succeed at everything. She can teach you how to succeed at tennis. She has succeeded in a difficult career. She succeeded to the throne in 1558. The appeal is unlikely to succeed. The book succeeds beautifully in presenting the problem before us. The plan succeeded pretty well. They very nearly succeeded in blowing up the building. This option has rarely succeeded in recent years. We feel that we have largely succeeded in our aims. We succeeded in repairing the engine. hints on how to succeed with interior design the pressure on children to succeed academically to succeed against serious opposition I tried to discuss it with her but only succeeded in making her angry. She doesn’t have the ruthlessness to succeed in business. The engineering career structure worked against women succeeding. They are being given the confidence and motivation to succeed academically. We are looking for individuals with a determination to succeed.Idioms
    nothing succeeds like success
     
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    (saying) when you are successful in one area of your life, it often leads to success in other areas
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: succeed