Definition of supersede verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

 

supersede

 verb
verb
BrE BrE//ˌsuːpəˈsiːd//
 
, BrE//ˌsjuːpəˈsiːd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌsuːpərˈsiːd//
 
Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they supersede
BrE BrE//ˌsuːpəˈsiːd//
 
, BrE//ˌsjuːpəˈsiːd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌsuːpərˈsiːd//
 
he / she / it supersedes
BrE BrE//ˌsuːpəˈsiːdz//
 
, BrE//ˌsjuːpəˈsiːdz//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌsuːpərˈsiːdz//
 
past simple superseded
BrE BrE//ˌsuːpəˈsiːdɪd//
 
, BrE//ˌsjuːpəˈsiːdɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌsuːpərˈsiːdɪd//
 
past participle superseded
BrE BrE//ˌsuːpəˈsiːdɪd//
 
, BrE//ˌsjuːpəˈsiːdɪd//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌsuːpərˈsiːdɪd//
 
-ing form superseding
BrE BrE//ˌsuːpəˈsiːdɪŋ//
 
, BrE//ˌsjuːpəˈsiːdɪŋ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ˌsuːpərˈsiːdɪŋ//
 
 
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supersede something/somebody [often passive] to take the place of something/somebody that is considered to be old-fashioned or no longer the best available The theory has been superseded by more recent research. Word Origin late 15th cent. (in the sense ‘postpone, defer’): from Old French superseder, from Latin supersedere ‘be superior to’, from super- ‘above’ + sedere ‘sit’. The current sense dates from the mid 17th cent.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: supersede