English

Definition of teach verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

      

    teach

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//tiːtʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//tiːtʃ//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they teach
    BrE BrE//tiːtʃ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//tiːtʃ//
     
    he / she / it teaches
    BrE BrE//ˈtiːtʃɪz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtiːtʃɪz//
     
    past simple taught
    BrE BrE//tɔːt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//tɔːt//
     
    past participle taught
    BrE BrE//tɔːt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//tɔːt//
     
    -ing form teaching
    BrE BrE//ˈtiːtʃɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtiːtʃɪŋ//
     
    Teaching and learning
     
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  1. 1  [intransitive, transitive] to give lessons to students in a school, college, university, etc.; to help somebody learn something by giving information about it She teaches at our local school. He taught for several years before becoming a writer. teach something I'll be teaching history and sociology next term. (North American English) to teach school (= teach in a school) teach something to somebody He teaches English to advanced students. teach somebody something He teaches them English. Vocabulary BuildingTeach and teachersVerbs teachJohn teaches French at the local school. She taught me how to change a tyre. educateOur priority is to educate people about the dangers of drugs. instructMembers of staff should be instructed in the use of fire equipment. trainShe’s a trained midwife. He’s training the British Olympic swimming team. coachHe’s the best football player I’ve ever coached. (British English) She coaches some of the local children in maths. tutor (North American English) She tutors some of the local children in math.Nouns teacherschool/​college teachers instructora swimming/​science instructor trainera horse trainer Do you have a personal trainer? coacha football coach tutortutors working with migrant children See related entries: Teaching and learning
  2. 2  [transitive] to show somebody how to do something so that they will be able to do it themselves teach (somebody to do) something Could you teach me to do that? teach somebody how, what, etc… My father taught me how to ride a bike.
  3. 3  [transitive] to make somebody feel or think in a different way teach somebody to do something She taught me to be less critical of other people. teach (somebody) that… My parents taught me that honesty was always the best policy. teach somebody something Our experience as refugees taught us many valuable lessons.
  4. 4[transitive, no passive] (informal) to persuade somebody not to do something again by making them suffer so much that they are afraid to do it teach somebody to do something Lost all your money? That'll teach you to gamble. I'll teach you to call (= punish you for calling) me a liar! teach somebody something The accident taught me a lesson I'll never forget. More Like This Verbs with two objects bet, bring, build, buy, cost, get, give, leave, lend, make, offer, owe, pass, pay, play, post, promise, read, refuse, sell, send, show, sing, take, teach, tell, throw, wish, writeSee worksheet.
  5. Word Origin Old English tǣcan ‘show, present, point out’, of Germanic origin; related to token, from an Indo-European root shared by Greek deiknunai ‘show’, deigma ‘sample’.Extra examples I am not qualified to teach this subject. I’m trying to teach my daughter to behave. She teaches English to Polish students. information which helps the teacher teach more effectively teaching children about the world around them the languages that are commonly taught in schools today training courses designed to teach managerial techniques I’ll be teaching history and sociology next term. to teach schoolIdioms
    teach your grandmother to suck eggs
     
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    (British English, informal) to tell or show somebody how to do something that they can already do well, and probably better than you can
    (you can’t) teach an old dog new tricks
     
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    (saying) (you cannot) successfully make people change their ideas, methods of work, etc., when they have had them for a long time
    to teach students only what is necessary in order to pass a particular test, rather than help them develop a range of skills
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: teach