Definition of though adverb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

  

though

 adverb
adverb
BrE BrE//ðəʊ//
 
; NAmE NAmE//ðoʊ//
 
 
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 used especially at the end of a sentence to add a fact or an opinion that makes the previous statement less strong or less important Our team lost. It was a good game though. ‘Have you ever been to Australia?’ ‘No. I'd like to, though.’ Which Word?although / even though / though You can use these words to show contrast between two clauses or two sentences. Though is used more in spoken than in written English. You can use although, even though and though at the beginning of a sentence or clause that has a verb. Notice where the commas go:Although/​Even though/​Though everyone played well, we lost the game. We lost the game, although/​even though/​though everyone played well. You cannot use even on its own at the beginning of a sentence or clause instead of although, even though or though:Even everyone played well, we lost the game. Word Origin Old English thēah, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch and German doch; superseded in Middle English by forms from Old Norse thó, thau.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: though