English

Definition of thread verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    thread

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//θred//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//θred//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they thread
    BrE BrE//θred//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//θred//
     
    he / she / it threads
    BrE BrE//θredz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//θredz//
     
    past simple threaded
    BrE BrE//ˈθredɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈθredɪd//
     
    past participle threaded
    BrE BrE//ˈθredɪd//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈθredɪd//
     
    -ing form threading
    BrE BrE//ˈθredɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈθredɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[transitive] thread something (+ adv./prep.) to pass something long and thin, especially thread, through a narrow opening or hole to thread a needle (with cotton) to thread cotton through a needle A tiny wire is threaded through a vein to the heart.
  2. 2[intransitive, transitive] to move or make something move through a narrow space, avoiding things that are in the way synonym pick your way (across, along, among, over, through something) + adv./prep. The waiters threaded between the crowded tables. thread your way + adv./prep. It took me a long time to thread my way through the crowd.
  3. 3[transitive] thread something (onto something) to join two or more objects together by passing something long and thin through them to thread beads (onto a string) Thread the cubes of meat and vegetables onto metal skewers.
  4. 4[transitive] thread something to pass film, tape, string, etc. through parts of a piece of equipment so that it is ready to use
  5. 5[transitive, usually passive] thread something (with something) to sew or twist a particular type of thread into something a robe threaded with gold and silver
  6. Word Origin Old English thrǣd (noun), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch draad and German Draht, also to the verb throw. The verb dates from late Middle English.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: thread