English

Definition of tickle verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    tickle

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈtɪkl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtɪkl//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they tickle
    BrE BrE//ˈtɪkl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtɪkl//
     
    he / she / it tickles
    BrE BrE//ˈtɪklz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtɪklz//
     
    past simple tickled
    BrE BrE//ˈtɪkld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtɪkld//
     
    past participle tickled
    BrE BrE//ˈtɪkld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtɪkld//
     
    -ing form tickling
    BrE BrE//ˈtɪklɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtɪklɪŋ//
     
     
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  1. 1[transitive, intransitive] tickle (somebody/something) to move your fingers on a sensitive part of somebody’s body in a way that makes them laugh The bigger girls used to chase me and tickle me. I tickled his feet with a feather. Stop tickling!
  2. 2[transitive, intransitive] tickle (something) to produce a slightly uncomfortable feeling in a sensitive part of the body; to have a feeling like this His beard was tickling her cheek. My throat tickles. a tickling cough
  3. 3[transitive] to amuse and interest somebody tickle somebody/something to tickle somebody’s imagination tickle somebody to do something I was tickled to discover that we'd both done the same thing.
  4. Word Origin Middle English (in the sense ‘be delighted or thrilled’): perhaps a frequentative of the verb tick, or an alteration of Scots and dialect kittle ‘to tickle’.Idioms (informal) to be very pleased or amused She was tickled pink to be given flowers. See related entries: Happiness
    tickle somebody’s fancy
     
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    (informal) to please or amuse somebody See if any of these tickle your fancy. If you see something that tickles your fancy, I’ll buy it for you.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: tickle