Definition of total verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    total

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//ˈtəʊtl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtoʊtl//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they total
    BrE BrE//ˈtəʊtl//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtoʊtl//
     
    he / she / it totals
    BrE BrE//ˈtəʊtlz//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtoʊtlz//
     
    past simple totalled
    BrE BrE//ˈtəʊtld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtoʊtld//
     
    past participle totalled
    BrE BrE//ˈtəʊtld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtoʊtld//
     
    (US English) past simple totaled
    BrE BrE//ˈtəʊtld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtoʊtld//
     
    (all US English) past participle totaled
    BrE BrE//ˈtəʊtld//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtoʊtld//
     
    -ing form totalling
    BrE BrE//ˈtəʊtlɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtoʊtlɪŋ//
     
    (US English) -ing form totaling
    BrE BrE//ˈtəʊtlɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtoʊtlɪŋ//
     
    Motoring problems and accidents
     
    jump to other results
  1. 1total something to reach a particular total Imports totalled $1.5 billion last year.
  2. 2total something/somebody (up) to add up the numbers of something/somebody and get a total Each student's points were totalled and entered in a list.
  3. 3total something (informal, especially North American English) to damage a car very badly, so that it is not worth repairing it see also write somethingoff See related entries: Motoring problems and accidents
  4. Word Origin late Middle English: via Old French from medieval Latin totalis, from totum ‘the whole’, neuter of Latin totus ‘whole, entire’. The verb, at first in the sense ‘add up’, dates from the late 16th cent.Extra examples Each student’s points were totalled and entered in a list. She never forgave him for totaling her car. Imports totalled $1.5 billion last year. In 2005–6, college enrolments totalled some 5 400.
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: total