Definition of track verb from the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary

     

    track

     verb
    verb
    BrE BrE//træk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//træk//
     
    Verb Forms present simple I / you / we / they track
    BrE BrE//træk//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//træk//
     
    he / she / it tracks
    BrE BrE//træks//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//træks//
     
    past simple tracked
    BrE BrE//trækt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//trækt//
     
    past participle tracked
    BrE BrE//trækt//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//trækt//
     
    -ing form tracking
    BrE BrE//ˈtrækɪŋ//
     
    ; NAmE NAmE//ˈtrækɪŋ//
     
     
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    follow
  1. 1[transitive, intransitive] track (somebody/something) to find somebody/something by following the marks, signs, information, etc., that they have left behind them hunters tracking and shooting bears
  2. 2[transitive] track somebody/something | track where, how, etc… to follow the movements of somebody/something, especially by using special electronic equipment We continued tracking the plane on our radar.
  3. 3[transitive] track somebody/something | track where, how, etc… to follow the progress or development of somebody/something The research project involves tracking the careers of 400 graduates. see also fast-track
  4. of camera
  5. 4[intransitive] + adv./prep. to move in relation to the thing that is being filmed The camera eventually tracked away.
  6. school students
  7. 5[transitive] (North American English) = stream
  8. leave marks
  9. 6[transitive] track something (+ adv./prep.) (especially North American English) to leave dirty marks behind you as you walk Don't track mud on my clean floor.
  10. Word Origin late 15th cent. (in the sense ‘trail, marks left behind’): the noun from Old French trac, perhaps from Low German or Dutch trek ‘draught, drawing’; the verb (current senses dating from the mid 16th cent.) from French traquer or directly from the noun.Extra examples Police are still trying to track down the witness. We finally managed to track him down to a retirement home in Sussex. The men earned their living tracking and shooting bears. The research project involves tracking the careers of 400 law school graduates. They tracked the herd for miles. a comparison of schools that track and don’t track in math Phrasal Verbstrack down somebody
See the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary entry: track